Please read: https://thenewstack.io/can-c-be-saved-bjarne-stroustrup-on-ensuring-memory-safety 

Bjarne gave us an introduction last week at the WG21 ISO C++ Standards meeting, in Issaquah on these safety profiles.  As per ISO policies the meeting was not recorded.  I am sure that he will give this talk again soon where he can present some of these ideas publicly.

These tools are not ready yet. The idea is a good start, but we can not tool ourselves out of this.  It does not remove any legacy compatibility.  It only checks that what you are doing now is safe(r).  Just because C++ has legacy compatibility does not imply that you should be using these older mechanisms.

On Tue, Feb 14, 2023 at 9:13 AM Jason McKesson via Std-Proposals <std-proposals@lists.isocpp.org> wrote:
On Tue, Feb 14, 2023 at 12:02 PM Roberto R via Std-Proposals
<std-proposals@lists.isocpp.org> wrote:
>
> Hi all
>
> I guess many of you have read articles about Microsoft, Google and NSA saying that it is better to stop to use C++ and use instead memory safe languages like Rust or Java.

No, I haven't heard about that. Though I'm not sure what it matters.

> Is it possible to make C++ a memory safe language?

Not without throwing away backwards compatibility and effectively
turning it into a different language. And since different languages
already exist, and this would force people to rewrite their code
anyway, I'm not sure why they would rewrite it in this new C++.
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